On the Edge: from transgression to frontier

19 October - 14 December

Gordon Senior, Adam King, Antonia Beard, Fliss Cary, Joanne Soroka, Alison Counsell, Jayne Ivimey

 

Gordon Senior

Gordon Senior, 3 tools from Spanish series, 2003

Gordon Senior will show a collection of his Tools of Uncertain Use - a witty collection of sense and nonsense - possibly useful, puzzling and thought-provoking about what we save, how we make things and what gets discarded.

 

Antonia Beard

Antonia Beard: Whole Grain, 2018

Antonia Beard will make a environmental installation developing from her work for Houghton Festival in August.

 

Adam King

Adam King, Storm Bird, 2018






 

Joanne Soroka

My ancestors emigrated from Lithuania, Ukraine, Japan and Scotland to Canada, and now I have emigrated to Scotland. This tapestry suggests movement between two areas, as well as the connections and displacement between them. The rising feeling is about the positive aspects of migration, but there can also be nostalgia for the old life.
— Joanne Soroka
 

Joanne Soroka will also be showing a work which has occupied her attention for a number of years - a Muslim prayer rug, which she has painstakingly repaired and remade, as an act of tribute to its makers and an attempt at addressing some of the troubling issues of Islamophobia and making reparations both physically and metaphorically.

Joanne Soroka, Prayer Rug

 

Alison Counsell

Alison is contributing a body of work that reflects on the landscapes she walks daily with her dogs, at the edges of Sheffield. Not only do they make use of the resources she has found lying about, but they are fashioned with metals into beautiful metaphors about a hybrid existence, between categories of the natural world and industrial skills, between decoration and utility.

Alison Counsell, Woodland Work #1, 2019

 

Fliss Cary

Fliss Cary, Graffitti, drypoint etching from Encroachment series, 2019

Fliss Cary, drypoint etching from Edgeland series, 2019















19 October - 14 December 2019:

On the Edge: from transgression to frontier

including work by Gordon Senior, Adam King, Antonia Beard, Fliss Cary, Joanne Soroka, Alison Counsell, Jayne Ivimey

Edges can be fascinating as places where ecosystems collide. Being edgy is to be a frontier, at the avant-garde. It can also be a place of danger, teetering over a precipice. Or there can be an edge of anticipation, a state of encouter. Several installations will form the core of this exhibition, each one raising a different edge issue.

Gordon Senior

Gordon Senior moved to Central California in 2002 where he was chair and professor of Fine Art at California State University Stanislaus. He returned to live and work in North Norfolk in 2017. His sculptural work reflects the cultural differences experienced, and addresses our common loss of relationship with the land.

Senior is preoccupied with the creatures we share the earth with. There is a sense that humans once belonged to the earth, but have progressively been losing this belonging, turning into urbanised, displaced landscape tourists.

Some of Gordon Senior’s Tools of Uncertain Use

Antonia Beard

Antonia is a London based artist with a background in textile design. Her textiles background has had a huge impact on her philosophy to art making.

She spent time in Cambodia studying ancient textile techniques at the IKTT - the Institute of Khmer Traditional Textiles. Learning from Kikuo Morimoto and the artisans of the forest village, she understood how traditional textiles embody the landscape of a place, in a process that is deeply linked to the natural habit and cultural interaction. This perspective has fused with her passion for the sweaty, urban dance-floors of London and her upbringing in agricultural Berkshire, to create work that is rooted in the process of experience and material narratives.

Antonia Beard, installation shown at the Royal College of Art, 2018

Adam King

Norfolk based artist Adam King’s installation for the edges and stairwells of the building, is all about edges of towns, suburbs, and sprawl, and the challenges of incoming traffic and housing which increasingly permeate open country. Adam will work in residence over the summer building little structures and scenarios from paper, card and paint.

Adam King, To Future Lives, work in progress, 2019

Adam King, To Future Lives, work in progress, 2019

Joanne Soroka

Joanne Soroka will show tapestries and rugs touching on subjects of cultural and environmental edges - between different peoples, different religions and beliefs and different locations - and also different makers.

Joanne’s tapestries are often shaped, like continents or islands. They sometimes come in clusters and layers, rather than singular pieces. In ‘Migration’, there are the two distinct surfaces, the tufted area and the flat-woven one. This formal choice can suggest both isolation and connectivity, with the sometimes-interconnected areas saying that we are all linked. There is the possibility of migration, moving from one land mass to another, whether willingly or because of adverse circumstances. But there is hope as well, since no human is an island.

Joanne Soroka, Migration, tapestry

Joanne Soroka, detail from Prayer Rug

Joanne Soroka writes about Prayer Rug: ‘I thought about repairing my rugs, and thereby, metaphorically healing or making reparations to the Muslim community. After many false starts, I remembered the Japanese technique of kintsugi, a way of mending ceramics by using gold to join the broken pieces together. Rather than hiding the fracture, it shows the history of the object, with the breakage undisguised. I decided to use gold linen thread to mend the rugs, rather than trying to do a conventional repair. It would be impossible in any case to restore the rugs to their original state. The mending is in an open weave, distinguishing it from the tighter weave of the original rug. I would also not repair every hole or tear, to show that nothing is perfect, as Islamic rugs deliberately never are, and to metaphorically address the fact that much hurt remains. Besides the gold thread, there will be an additional interweaving of some of the original colours of the rug, in a ghostly repair of some areas.

Alison Counsell

Alison Counsell is an artist who specialises in metalwork and jewellery, often combining materials in innovative ways to bring out the characteristics of materials and to create vessel-like forms. Trained at Camberwell and the Royal College of Art, she has been a senior lecturer in jewellery and metalwork at Sheffield Hallam for many years. She has won numerous awards and her work is widely collected and represented in public and private collections, including the Victoria and Albert Museum, Millennium Gallery, Sheffield, National Library, Australia.

Alison Counsell. Woodland Work #2, 2019

On my arrival in Sheffield 30 years ago, the edgelands had penetrated deep into the core of this dying industrial city. Over the following years, I’ve observed this liminal space ever changing, as new developments are slowly pushing the edgeland back towards the edge again.

Edgeland Works are a growing sequence of artefacts. There has been a natural instinctiveness to create vessel forms – capturing moments in time
 These vessels suggest repositories for my walking, intuition, contemplation, curiosity 
this found, foundation piece
this instinct……this decision
this realisation
— Alison Counsell

Fliss Cary

Based on the edges of Norwich, Fliss Cary, like Alison Counsell in Sheffield is inspired by her daily walks with her dog to view this liminal landscape. Her walks take her past a power station, fields with cows, a meandering river, a flyover covered in graffitti. It is a typical town edge seeping into the countryside. The gradual disappearance of the traces of wild nature are troubling. Already there are plans for a solar farm. She asks, how much more will disappear into this growing infrastructure which supports the town? What is happening to the birds?

Fliss Cary, Fence, drypoint etching from Encroachment series, 2019