A transformation from industrial relic to gallery

The building began as a simple flat-roofed brick construction, built as a workshop in 1937 by Charles Winlove a furniture maker and publican, whose family owned a few properties nearby.

Charles Winlove and his two sons standing at the back of the building in the 1940s
Charles Winlove and his two sons stading at the rear of the building in the 1940as

After Winlove’s death the building stood empty. By 2013, it had been neglected and empty for over 20 years, a little relic of small-scale industry, containing the remnants of the workshop carpentry tools and his nephew’s E-type Jaguar. Sandy Heslop and Veronica Sekules bought it in 2013, spotting its potential as gallery and living space, with its plain industrial style, high ceilings and good light. Two years of complex negotiations with heritage and planning authorities followed.

The conversion

Hudson architects were commissioned to design its conversion, adding a third storey hudsonarchitects.co.uk

 One of the interim architect's drawings by award-winning practice Hudson Architects   http://hudsonarchitects.co.uk/
One of the interim architect’s drawings by award-winning practice Hudson Architects http://hudsonarchitects.co.uk/
 Adding the roof meant that the extra weight on the building and its quay-side foundations had to be carefully calculated by engineers, this drawig is by the award-winning Alan Conisbee.   http://www.conisbee.co.uk/
Adding the roof meant that the extra weight on the building and its quay-side foundations had to be carefully calculated by structural engineers, this drawing is by the award-winning Alan Conisbee. http://www.conisbee.co.uk/

The building was transformed with the further help of Conisbee engineers conisbee.co.uk and local builders Norfolk Building Co. thenorfolkbuildingco.co.uk

Sam of Norfolk Building Co and Adam from SGS Painting and Decorating working on the building

Final transformation to gallery

Bird after Bird exhibition sign providing a dramatic focus to the exterior view of the gallery
View through the first part of the exhibition
GroundWork’s main gallery is on the ground floor, used for changing exhibitions. The lighting system was designed by Joe Geitner
The upper floor was designed as flexible space with potential to be a studio flat, with kitchen, living and sleeping areas, terrace and workshop space. It is also used for display as part of the gallery exhibitions, including jewellery, crafts, pictures, textiles and occasional gallery events.
The Penthouse provides a comfortable suite to rent which sleeps from 2-4 people, with beautiful views of central King’s Lynn, the Custom House and Quay. It is carefully furnished with designer textiles.

The views outside

View of the 17th century Custom House and quayside from one of the Penthouse west windows
View from the rear across the Purfleet River bridge
The River Purfleet